The War on Women is a book that shocks. After every chapter you have to pause, think what you just read, take everything in. The inhumanity of man to women, and sometimes woman to women, the misogyny, the hatred, the fear towards women, it’s just heartbreaking.

It is a book filled with compelling stories of women, of injustice and abuse in countries with different cultures as Ireland and India,  in countries as distant as Egypt and Argentina. Sue Lloyd-Roberts believed that no country could take the moral high ground when it came to human rights abuses.

Abducted women are drugged and thrown out of planes by the junta in Argentina, during the “Dirty Wars”.  Young women as young as fourteen years old are raped in Kosovo by members of an international peacekeeping force. Girls endure ‘horrible, horrible pain’ because their external female genitalia have been partially or completely removed by force (FGM).  But it is also a book that inspires, because there are women that fight back. Like Maimouna from Gambia that fled her village in Gambia so she can stop her family’s tradition role i genital ‘cutting ceremonies. Or Célhia de Lavarène, the French journalist that fights human trafficking for sexual exploitation. Women that do make a difference.

Sue Lloyd-Roberts was a  determined and pioneer journalist, she exposed so many of world’s tyrannies. She was also  courageous and fearless campaigner who gave voice to people who otherwise would not be heard.

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